Move over for Terry Reid

February 15, 2012

Terry Reid is the man who turned down the chance to be lead singer with Led Zeppelin. A friend of Jimmy Page he was asked by Page to join his new group The New Yardbirds, instead he recommended another singer he knew Robert Plant from a midlands group called Band of Joy and he also recommended drummer John Bonham. Jimmy Page hired them both and Led Zeppelin was born.

But what is the story of Terry Reid.      

Terry started in music early at the age of 15 as the singer for Peter Jay & the Jaywalkers before going solo.

In 1968 Terry was a guitarist and singer of his own three~piece power band  and was signed to record producer Mickie Most who had worked with The Animals, Donovan, Jeff Beck amongst others and had a contract with EMI Records to release his records. At this stage Terry was more well~known in the US than in England having had his debut album ‘Bang Bang Your Terry Reid’ released over there. At the time of being asked to join Zeppelin he was about to have his new album ‘Superlungs’ released in both England and the US plus a support slot on the up and coming Cream tour of the States so the future looked bright for this 20~year~old kid! and one listen to the album ‘Superlungs’ and you know why Jimmy Page wanted him in his new band.

I saw Terry play in London in 1969 on the release of this album and he was one of the best live acts I have ever seen and still remains one of my all time favourites. Great Great voice ! His range and power can be heard on tracks ‘Speak Now or Forever Hold Your Peace’ and ‘Rich Kid Blues’ and the album ‘Superlungs’ is a lost gem! There are some clips of Terry on YouTube for you to see.  

Terry also toured with the Rolling Stones on the 1969 US tour and appeared at the Isle of Wight festival in England in 1970.                                                                                                                 

Both of these albums failed to sell in any quantities and frustrated with the Mickie Most contract situation the producer wouldn’t let him out of his contract for three years, so Terry decided to move to Los Angeles USA and finally released his next record on Atlantic Records in 1973 called ‘River’ which received little fanfare on either shores. This album has a very west coast laid back acoustic performance and is beautiful.

I saw Terry again in the early 70’s at the Marquee Club in London and the crowd wouldn’t let him off the stage and he was happy to play well past midnight that night.

Little was heard of him until 1976 with the release of ‘Seed of Memory’ my favourite Terry Reid album which was produced by ex~ Hollie Graham Nash and features David Lindley on guitar and is great from start to finish and has Terry in fine voice. The album did chart briefly in the USA  and was released on yet another label ABC Records, but unfortunately the label went out of business just after release of the album, so no tour or promotional. Shame ~  because  this should have been the album for him with a mixture of rock and blue ~ eyed soul.

Fast forward to 1979 and another new album ‘Rogue Waves’  on yet another record label Capitol Records but everything seemed right this time with Terry looking like a rock god on the cover but enter punk and disco and some over the top production on the record and it very quickly ended up in the record store delete bins, but the record does hold some magic moments like the opening track  ‘Ain’t No Shadow’ which shines brightly! No more was heard of Terry Reid during the 80’s.                           

I did try and track Terry down in the early 80’s while I was working at Polydor Records in London but ending up speaking to his Dad a couple of times and that was as far as I got.                                             

In the early 90’s he showed up on the soundtrack of the Tom Cruise film ‘Days of Thunder’ with a scorching version of the Spencer Davis classic ‘Gimme Some Lovin’ and this was followed by a new album on Warners called ‘The Driver’ which is a bit hit and miss but does have a great version of the Waterboys gem ‘The Whole of the Moon’.

If you like your singers in the Paul Rodgers, Stevie Winwood, Stevie Marriott range then Terry Reid will be a real treat for you and he still can be found playing live around the world today. 

  Who Knows ! Maybe Jimmy Page will link up with him one day or pay him a  finders fee for Robert Plant or maybe Jack White will record him~ he is also a big Terry Reid fan.

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JIMI HENDRIX in LONDON

January 15, 2011

Jimi Hendrix was born on November 27th 1942 on the third stone from the sun and passed away on September 18th 1970 in London far from home. I often think that he must have been a space ~ angel visiting us from outer space because he only released three albums in four years and then all of a sudden he was gone, not there anymore, leaving behind a legacy of three brilliant albums Are You Experienced ~ Axis : Bold As Love and Electric Ladyland all way ahead of their time!

Hendrix ~ There will never be another guitar player like him!   

Flying Jimi over to England from America was a master stroke by ex~Animals bassist Chas Chandler his new manager who promised to introduce him to Eric Clapton. I don’t think that Jimi would have made such a big impact if he had stayed in the USA, but swinging London in England in 1966 was the place to be, open to new sounds, looks and ideas which Jimi had in spades.

After many rehearsals two quirky English musicians were bought in to form The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Mitch Mitchell on Drums and Noel Redding on Bass complete with new afro hair styles!

Mitch Mitchell was a powerhouse drummer similar to jazz drummer Elvin Jones and a perfect foil for Hendrix, they had a great understanding like two playful eagles soaring through the sky duelling with each other and pushing the music on and on to see how far out they could get! Meanwhile bassist Noel Redding would try to underpin the rhythm and keep it all together.

While recording their first album in London, Jimi would travel around various clubs and watering holes where England’s established musicians like Eric Clapton, Brian Jones and Eric Burdon would hang out. Jimi would get up on stage and play his new metallic feedback guitar pryrotechnics and strike fear into the hearts of the likes of Clapton, Beck, Townsend and Page.

This guy was the real blues playing deal!                      

 Jimi was a vital link back to the early blues of Robert Johnson and add to that mix his futuristic use of the whammy bar on his Fender Stratocaster and the controlled feedback to take us all on a psychedelic star~spangled roller coaster ride!                  

The debut album ‘ Are You Experienced ‘ was released in 1967 and word spread quickly about the new guitar slinger in town and all Jimi had to say was ” Move over Rover and let Jimi take over! ” and the rest is history.                                  

Check out the pure blues of ‘ Red House ‘ and the sex of ‘ Foxy Lady ‘ coming to git yer!                                                                                                                                       

Heavy stuff and tour dates took there toll as Jimi never seemed to be off the road, working at a ridiculous pace with hardly any time for recording. The second album ‘ Axis : Bold As Love ‘ wasn’t as well received as the first one but still featured some great music like ‘ Castles Made of Sand ‘ ” Little Wing ‘ and ‘If Six Were Nine ‘ which appeared on the soundtrack to ‘Easy Rider ‘. This album showed Hendrix’s lighter, gentler and more melodic side and is a beauty. 

With the release of Hendrix’s epic third album ‘ Electric Ladyland’ we heard for the first time his beautiful interpretation of Dylan’s ‘All Along the Watchtower’. A lot of people have covered Bob Dylan’s songs but Hendrix made them his own! Just listen or watch ‘Like A Rolling Stone’ which he played to a thrilled crowd at the Monterey Festival on his first visit back to the USA. 

Listen to ‘Electic Ladyland ‘ on vinyl through headphones if you get a chance, there is not a bad track on this album and this is the bar to which every other guitar player is now judged by.    

I never met Hendrix, the closest I came was while working at the Marquee Studios in 1969 at the tender age of 16 when Keith Emerson who went on to form ELP booked the studio to have a jam with Hendrix one night but Hendrix was a no~show as we all waited until 2 am. Never mind! I did have a drink with Mitch Mitchell in the early 80’s at the Fulham Greyhound and he was full of stories and was a super nice guy.                                                                                                                

While on my epic road trip across the US a few years ago I stopped off in Renton, Washington State and visited the grave where Jimi rests. As I wandered around looking for the grave one of the groundsmen approached me and said ” I know who you’re looking for!” and took me to the Hendrix plot complete with guitar inscription and next to his grandmother. One minute silence was observed.

Fly on my sweet angel, fly on through the sky!


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